La Poblanita

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Courtesy of soypoblana.com (facebook.com/SoyPoblana)

This is Street Food

La Poblanita , located right near the Catedral de Puebla (in the historical center), is a street food vendor which sells antojitos. If you were to ask me what I think of when I think of Mexico, one of the first things I would say is ‘antojitos’. Antojitos means ‘little cravings’ and are the street foods of Mexico. Street foods in Mexico mostly include corn as their main ingredient. Here are just to name a few: tacos, tamales, memelas, gorditas, quesadillas, tortas, cemitas, chalupas, elotes, taquitos dorados, tostadas and molotes! Antojitos are sold EVERYWHERE, and I mean everywhere. You can always find something to eat in Mexico, day or night. You can’t go a block without antojitos being sold. And just because they are off the street doesn’t mean they are not safe to eat. I have never gotten food poisoning from street food, so don’t be scared to be adventurous. Try something new and be a real Mexican. Because real mexicans love their antojitos. Antojitos are sold by a lot of places during the day and generally close up shop by early evening, but at night a whole new set of vendors appear whether its in an actual building or being sold on the side of a street. I plan to make a lot of posts about different antojitos, so do not fret if you are puzzled as to what many of them are.

This post is about Molotes. Molotes are deep fried corn tortillas which have an oval shape. They are filled with the filling of your choice such as quesillo (my favourite) , mushrooms or many meat options. Aside: quesillo is a cheese from Oaxaca generally used in quesadillas and lots of antojitos. For vegetarians its a very tasty option. Anyway back to Molotes, once they are filled, they are deep fried, and served with salsa (rojo or verde) and sour cream. They are really really delicious- crunchy on the outside and the salsa and cream take it to the next level.

La Poblanita which is very well known in Puebla has been around for about 30 years. The weird thing is that they sell molotes throughout the day whereas usually molotes are mostly sold as a night street food. It’s cheating a bit eating them during the day, but they taste so good I don’t really care if it’s not the proper way! I guess eating a molote during the day is a bit like having a cappuccino after 11am in Italy.

Señoritas de la Poblanita

Here are some tips for ordering antojitos in Mexico:

  • Its not really in the mexican culture for them to ask you what you want to eat. To get the vendors attention you need to say either ‘señorita/señora’ for women and for men you say ‘joven’ which means young man (usually you will only find men selling tacos).
  • You should then ask for what you want and ask how much it costs (‘cuanto cuesta?’). A molote at La Poblanita costs about 16 pesos. If you want a soda with it I recommend Mexican Coca Cola (in the glass bottle). Mexican Coca-Cola is the best coke in the world so don’t pass up on the opportunity to try it. Often the soda will cost more than the antojito (usually 10-12 pesos). Its also absolutely fine to ask for whatever you want even if its not necessarily on the menu. For example if you want mushrooms and quesillo, then go for it. Mexicans are very accommodating. Same goes with if you don’t want the salsa (though I think that would be a fatal mistake).
  • At La Poblanita they will give you your antojito on a plate and along with everyone else you should stand and eat your food. This is very normal in Mexico. Even if there are no chairs, people will stand by the vendor and eat their food. There is often a little sideboard to place your dish on as you can see in the picture below. At night if you are driving around you will see people standing outside vendors eating, just like I have described.

Mexico is probably the best place in the world to eat after a night out or if you are craving a midnight snack.

  • Now if you want to be really Mexican here’s the way to do it: when you get your food or if there are people around you eating, you always say ” ¡Provecho! (short for buen provecho), and when you leave , if people are still eating then you also say ¡Provecho!

I have met a lot of foreigners in Puebla who are a bit wary of eating street food. Don’t be. It’s one of the things that makes Mexico so great.

¡Provecho!

Un Molote de Quesillo con Salsa Verde y Crema

Memela Compro, Memela Como

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Courtesy of soypoblana.com (facebook.com/SoyPoblana)

This is Memela

A memela is an antojito (street food) from Oaxaca (pronounced Wahaca, which also happens to be the name of an excellent mexican restaurant chain in London). It is made, like many antojitos, from masa. Frijoles (refried beans) are added to the masa before it is flattened with a tortilla press and then cooked on a hot grill. Once the base, which is touching the grill, is cooked and charred, salsa (red or green is your choice) is smothered across it, to which usually crumbly cheese (I recommend to ask for quesillo which is oaxacan stringy cheese similar to mozzarella) is added. Additional toppings can also include avocado, papas fritas (fries), nopales (cactus) and/or chicharron. You can always order a dish however you want in Mexico, so if you want everything on your memela, or a different topping, don’t hesitate to ask for it (as long as they have the ingredients). The easiest way to eat it is by folding it in half and using your hands. As usual, it is best served with an ice cold glass bottled coca-cola. Like picaditas (see post here) they can also be bought ‘raw’ as discussed.

Cost: between 9-15 pesos.

¡Provecho!

Una memela roja por favor con puro quesillo, aguacate y papas fritas

 

The (Poblana) Cemita

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Courtesy of soypoblana.com (facebook.com/SoyPoblana)

This is La Cemita

The Cemita has a lot of sandwich respect, not only in its hometown of Puebla, but also across Mexico and the entire world. Super foodies know about cemitas; as I discovered in an article entitled ‘iconic sandwiches in the world‘. Two of Mexico’s sandwiches are listed in the 27, and deservedly so. The other sandwich is called a Torta (but I will save that for another post). How do cemitas and tortas differ? Well the real difference is the bread. A cemita, which is also the name of the roll, is a brioche type bread with sesames on it.  The filling is usually refried beans, avocado, chipotle or some chiles if you like spiciness, quesillo (Oaxaca stringy cheese) and a meat, the most popular being milanesa (which is breadcrumbed beef). Cemitas are often served toasted, as I prefer, and are really sabrosa (tasty).  You can also buy the rolls on their own in markets, if you want to make them at home. These days cemitas are easily found across the states, so don’t worry if you are not planning a mexico trip soon. Though you might have to wait a bit longer if you are from the UK or Europe.

Cost: 20-25 pesos per filled cemita. For just the roll approximately 3 pesos.

 

¡Provecho!

Cut in half toasted cemita

Check out Soy Poblana’s facebook page for additional posts and information about life in Puebla and Mexico!

Vamos a Huatulco

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Courtesy of soypoblana.com (facebook.com/SoyPoblana)

This is Huatulco, Oaxaca

Soy Poblana loves Puebla, BUT Mexico is a big place full of other great places to visit too. Recently I visited Huatulco which is in the state of Oaxaca. Huatulco is a beach town consisting of nine beautiful bays, located on the pacific coast. It is also home to a vibrant town centre that has many bars, restaurants and shops. Huatulco is a welcome change to the obvious choice of Cancún, and a much cheaper one too. Though Cancún has much to offer and is worth the visit, Huatulco is far moremexican, more authentic and offers a beach resort which has not been americanised. And of course it is in the great state of Oaxaca, which has so much character and charm. Huatulco remains a well kept secretly internationally with only 20% of its tourism coming from oversees. Its high seasons are in the months of June/ July and over the Christmas/ New Year period.

All roads leading to Huatulco

There is lots to do in Huatulco, the most popular being visiting the bays.  There are daily boat trips offered my numerous companies that take you around all the bays leaving from Bahía de Santa Cruz. One of these bays is Bahía Cacaluta (protected by the national park in which it is located) which is only accessible by boat and was the filming location of the beach in ‘Y tu mamá también‘. The bay is about 1 km long and has been untouched by tourism.  These boat trips allow you to get off and swim in a couple of the bays, and also grab lunch.  Alternatively (or additionally) you can access the bays by foot or taxi if you want to spend longer at individual ones. Bahía Chahué is the most easily accessible beach and in walking distance from many of the hotels. It is home to a couple of beach clubs, and a bar/restaurant which has two swimming pools available to the public.

Playa Entrega

Bahía Chahué

Aside from the magnificent bays, which offer great snorkelling opportunities (I recommend La playa Entrega which is accesible by Taxi), boat trips, speed boats and banana boats, there are also other activities available such as white water rafting, horseback riding, or relaxing at a local spa. This is a lively town by night, with the town centre (La Crucecita) located away from the beaches, offering its own unique atmosphere and a great night out. There are also night clubs and bars by the beaches such as La Papaya.

White Water Rafting at a nearby river in Huatulco

The prices in Huatulco are very reasonable for a beach resort, you should except to be paying around 20/25 pesos for a beer (the cost of a beer is always my measure of whether I am getting ripped off or not). However if you want to drink/eat right on the beach, the prices increase dramatically. For this reason I recommend eating out in La Crucecita, and if you want to drink on the beach (who doesn’t?) then bring a cooler full to the brim with ice cold cervezas.  One beach-side restaurant which offers good prices is ‘Ve el Mar‘ located in the bay of Santa Cruz. Like many restaurants in Huatulco they offer excellent fish and seafood dishes.  Within La Crucecita, along with restaurants and bars, there is also a market called ‘El Mercado 3 Mayo’ which is a great place to grab breakfast or lunch for great prices.

Sunshine is expected for about 330 days of the year in Huatulco with an average temperature of  28°C.

Temazcal Spa

Where to stay in Huatulco? It really depends on your budget, keeping in mind that you can get a lot more from your money if you are coming from abroad, you can get high standard hotels for cheaper than you would expect.  Also there are cheaper options too. I recommend usinghotel/travel websites using the budget you have, keeping in mind whether a swimming pool is important to your trip as not all hotels offer them. Many hotels also offer beach clubs (if they are not located on a beach) which often also have a swimming pool.

How to get to Huatulco?  Huatulco has an international airport which receives flights from the USA and also Mexico City (2 hour flight) and Oaxaca (the state capital).  You can get there by car which takes about 8.5 hours (from Puebla) or by bus which takes about 12 hours (from Puebla). The bus is a very good option if you don’t have a car, with the cheapest return fair costing only 1000 pesos. The bus leaves (from CAPU) in the evening so you arrive in the morning in Huatulco. Mexico offers different levels of buses, with added things included for the more you pay (for example movies / larger seats / wifi). Though the basic buses are very comfortable and an inexpensive way to get around Mexico.  ADO is the bus line which goes to Oaxaca and Huatulco.

Anything else?  Puerto Escondido, only an hour or two away from Huatulco, is a bohemian beach town which is also worth the visit and worth tagging on to your trip if you can.

Check out Soy Poblana’s facebook page for additional posts and information about life in Puebla and Mexico!

Visit Mexico this Winter

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Courtesy of soypoblana.com (facebook.com/SoyPoblana)

Winter in the Sun

[Note: This is a guest post written in partnership with ‘Journey Latin America‘]

We all know how it is.  The winter blues. It’s cold, it’s rainy and it certainly is not sunny.  That is certainly not the case here in sunny sunny Mexico. I present to you two great destinations to visit this winter: firstly, Puebla,Mexico’s best kept secret, a colonial city on the foothills of the Sierra Madre and secondly, Huatulco, an untouched breath taking beach resort, located on the pacific coast. Each offer a vastly different holiday experience, neither of which should be missed out on.

Puebla’s Historical Center

Puebla, only two hours away from Mexico City, is the fourth biggest city in Mexico. Relatively unvisited, it is fantastically authentic and home to, in my opinion and to many others, the best street food in Mexico. Visiting Puebla will give you a great city experience, with so much culture and tradition to discover. For example, did you know that 5 de Mayo happened in Puebla, or that it is home to mole, tacos arabes, cemitas, and memelas? Puebla has a very agreeable climate year round.  In the winter it has temperatures of around 20 degrees Celsius during the day, and 10 degrees in the evening. This is an alternative Mexican holiday that will show the realMexico whilst giving you the warm weather you are missing at home.

Fun in the Sun, Huatulco, Oaxaca

About 9 hours down the road is Huatulco (home of the beach in ‘Y tu mamá también’) in the state of Oaxaca. It is a worthy alternative to Cancún, not only in offering cheaper prices, but in that it offers a far more Mexicanexperience.  It is comprised of 9 bays, each with their unique charm. A boat trip of all the bays, snorkelling, beers on the beach, eating delicious seafood, sunbathing, and rafting are musts for your visit. The resort really is a well kept secret by Mexicans, with less than twenty percent of tourism coming from outside of the country.  However it is easily accessible as it has its own airport with daily flights from Mexico City. How about the weather? Temperatures go from 30/35 degrees Celsius during the day to 15/20 degrees in the evenings.

Now it might be that you sound the like of both and you have a couple of weeks to spare. ‘Journey Latin America‘ a London based travel agency with an excellent reputation, offers holidays to Mexico including a two week trip that visits Puebla, Huatulco, and the wonderful city of Oaxaca as well as Monte Alban, Teotihuacan, and Mexico City. Check out ‘Oaxaca and the Pacific Coast‘ for the full itinerary.

To read more about Puebla, including its wonderful food, check out the other posts on the blog, and the official facebook page. Also check out more in-depth post on Huatulco.

El Flamingo – Tortas de Puebla

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Courtesy of soypoblana.com (facebook.com/SoyPoblana)

This is Tortas

Okay, you got me! Tortas are not specifically from Puebla, but good ones are. Too controversial? If you disagree, then please comment below, and pictures provide good evidence. So what’s so special about Poblana tortas? Well I am just basing this on DF and Puebla tortas, but first of all they are crunchier, and most definitely a different shape. For my tasting DF’s tortas are a little too soft. Yes I am a crunchy roll kind of a gal.

A torta in my opinion should be about the size in the picture (maybe a little bigger) and either an oval or circular shape. Inside the Torta, there should be frijoles (beans), avocado, onion, tomato, rajas (if you like spicy), quesillo, and a meat of your choice, if you should desire. Also a bit of mayonnaise can make quite the difference. Personally I also like my Torta toasted.

If that sounds good to you, and you like the look of the picture, then check out ‘El Flamingo’ which is in ‘El Centro’. I recommend these tortas, as they make them just as I mentioned before, and a bonus is that the ‘Milanesa’ isn’t greasy. ‘Milanesa’ is either pork or chicken covered in bread crumbs that is fried (similar to Escalope Vienes/ Wiener Schnitzel), so sometimes if not done correctly can be a little greasy. That is certainly not the case at ‘El Flamingo’. They also serve delicious juices, licuados, and aguas. More on types of drinks to follow in another post!

¡Provecho!

El Flamingo is located on Av. 2 Poniente between 3 Sur and 5 de Mayo.