Pan Dulce

Standard

Courtesy of soypoblana.com (facebook.com/SoyPoblana)

This is Breakfast

A Basket of Pan Dulce (Sweet Breads)

Breakfast in Mexico is a very important affair. This is a country where breakfast really is the cardinal meal of the day. My spanish teacher joked this week about foreigners who only eat a piece of toast for breakfast. Her mocking of us, really summed up the mexicans’ love for ‘desayuno’.  If you go out for breakfast, which a lot of families do at the weekends , or if you are making a big family breakfast, the meal begins with Pan Dulce. Pan Dulce means ‘sweet bread’. They come in many different forms but they are ALL tasty! As a european, they remind me of home, as they taste like patisseries with a mexican twist. . As a foreigner, I would be happy just eating pan dulce and stopping there, but this is Mexico, so make sure to save room for the huge amount of food that follows. Pan Dulce are also eaten as a ‘Merienda‘. They can be bought from a lot of tiendas (small grocery shops equivalent to corner shops in the UK) and also bakeries (‘panaderías’).

Pan Dulce is sold in a lot of Miscelenea Tiendas

My favourite Pan Dulce (that I have tried so far) is the Concha, which means ‘shell’. Its soft and light in the middle with a textured shell. Its crumbly and absolutely delicious.

¡Provecho!

Una Concha

PICA PICADITAS

Standard

Courtesy of soypoblana.com (facebook.com/SoyPoblana)

This is Picadita

A picadita is an antojito (see this previous post on antojitos/street food for all the information you need on them). They are made using a circle ofmasa which is then pinched all around its circumference, fried and topped with salsa (red or green as always, remember to ask which is spicier), and a variety of toppings such as cheese, chorizo/longaniza, chicharron, and papas if you so desire. More often served in the morning, picaditas are very tasty, and easily made at home. They can be bought before they are cooked (pinched and made into the correct shape) just the same way you can buy tortillas and memelas. Usually these are sold by indigenous women on streets, but can also be found in local tiendas (shops). In some neighbourhoods (colonias) they come selling door to door, so don’t pass up on this opportunity to try them!

Cost: approximately 6 pesos each for cooked ones, 2 pesos each for “raw” ones.

¡Provecho!

Dos picaditas por favor, una verde y una roja