Vamos a Huatulco


Courtesy of (

This is Huatulco, Oaxaca

Soy Poblana loves Puebla, BUT Mexico is a big place full of other great places to visit too. Recently I visited Huatulco which is in the state of Oaxaca. Huatulco is a beach town consisting of nine beautiful bays, located on the pacific coast. It is also home to a vibrant town centre that has many bars, restaurants and shops. Huatulco is a welcome change to the obvious choice of Cancún, and a much cheaper one too. Though Cancún has much to offer and is worth the visit, Huatulco is far moremexican, more authentic and offers a beach resort which has not been americanised. And of course it is in the great state of Oaxaca, which has so much character and charm. Huatulco remains a well kept secretly internationally with only 20% of its tourism coming from oversees. Its high seasons are in the months of June/ July and over the Christmas/ New Year period.

All roads leading to Huatulco

There is lots to do in Huatulco, the most popular being visiting the bays.  There are daily boat trips offered my numerous companies that take you around all the bays leaving from Bahía de Santa Cruz. One of these bays is Bahía Cacaluta (protected by the national park in which it is located) which is only accessible by boat and was the filming location of the beach in ‘Y tu mamá también‘. The bay is about 1 km long and has been untouched by tourism.  These boat trips allow you to get off and swim in a couple of the bays, and also grab lunch.  Alternatively (or additionally) you can access the bays by foot or taxi if you want to spend longer at individual ones. Bahía Chahué is the most easily accessible beach and in walking distance from many of the hotels. It is home to a couple of beach clubs, and a bar/restaurant which has two swimming pools available to the public.

Playa Entrega

Bahía Chahué

Aside from the magnificent bays, which offer great snorkelling opportunities (I recommend La playa Entrega which is accesible by Taxi), boat trips, speed boats and banana boats, there are also other activities available such as white water rafting, horseback riding, or relaxing at a local spa. This is a lively town by night, with the town centre (La Crucecita) located away from the beaches, offering its own unique atmosphere and a great night out. There are also night clubs and bars by the beaches such as La Papaya.

White Water Rafting at a nearby river in Huatulco

The prices in Huatulco are very reasonable for a beach resort, you should except to be paying around 20/25 pesos for a beer (the cost of a beer is always my measure of whether I am getting ripped off or not). However if you want to drink/eat right on the beach, the prices increase dramatically. For this reason I recommend eating out in La Crucecita, and if you want to drink on the beach (who doesn’t?) then bring a cooler full to the brim with ice cold cervezas.  One beach-side restaurant which offers good prices is ‘Ve el Mar‘ located in the bay of Santa Cruz. Like many restaurants in Huatulco they offer excellent fish and seafood dishes.  Within La Crucecita, along with restaurants and bars, there is also a market called ‘El Mercado 3 Mayo’ which is a great place to grab breakfast or lunch for great prices.

Sunshine is expected for about 330 days of the year in Huatulco with an average temperature of  28°C.

Temazcal Spa

Where to stay in Huatulco? It really depends on your budget, keeping in mind that you can get a lot more from your money if you are coming from abroad, you can get high standard hotels for cheaper than you would expect.  Also there are cheaper options too. I recommend usinghotel/travel websites using the budget you have, keeping in mind whether a swimming pool is important to your trip as not all hotels offer them. Many hotels also offer beach clubs (if they are not located on a beach) which often also have a swimming pool.

How to get to Huatulco?  Huatulco has an international airport which receives flights from the USA and also Mexico City (2 hour flight) and Oaxaca (the state capital).  You can get there by car which takes about 8.5 hours (from Puebla) or by bus which takes about 12 hours (from Puebla). The bus is a very good option if you don’t have a car, with the cheapest return fair costing only 1000 pesos. The bus leaves (from CAPU) in the evening so you arrive in the morning in Huatulco. Mexico offers different levels of buses, with added things included for the more you pay (for example movies / larger seats / wifi). Though the basic buses are very comfortable and an inexpensive way to get around Mexico.  ADO is the bus line which goes to Oaxaca and Huatulco.

Anything else?  Puerto Escondido, only an hour or two away from Huatulco, is a bohemian beach town which is also worth the visit and worth tagging on to your trip if you can.

Check out Soy Poblana’s facebook page for additional posts and information about life in Puebla and Mexico!

Chila Chilaquiles


Courtesy of (

This is Chilaquiles

Chilaquiles are one of the dishes that come to mind when I think of real authentic Mexican food.  If you are not in Mexico and you find a Mexican restaurant selling this dish, then you know it’s the real deal (not the type of place that sells HARD shelled tacos-what is that all about?!).  Chilaquiles are lightly fried strips of tortilla which have a red or green salsa poured on them. The dish is then topped with avocado, sliced onion, sour cream and cheese. It is most commonly also served with fried eggs or chicken, though a variety of toppings are often available (see picture above). The spiciness of the salsa depends place to place so always ask before whether the red or green is spicier. This is generally a breakfast dish, though delicious at any time of day and an excellent hangover cure!

Chilaquiles rojos con dos huevos estrellados

Check out Soy Poblana’s facebook page for additional posts and information about life in Puebla and Mexico!



Courtesy of (

This is Chalupas

A plate of chalupas

I haven’t said this in a while, but seriously, how amazing is Puebla! After living here for a while I think we all tend to forget what an amazing city and state this really is. My admiration really comes from the vast amount of dishes that are unique to Puebla. People think they know Mexican food, but really you don’t Mexico till you go to Puebla. Just thinking about uniquely poblana dishes, a huge list comes to mind, from Cemitas,Memelas, Mole, Chiles en Nogada, Tacos Árabes, etc. The list is endless. (More posts to follow on all of Puebla’s eclectic street food).

This post is about ‘chalupas’. It is true that a lot of Mexican dishes are very similar, many of them being variations of different tortilla combinations. But that doesn’t make any one of them any less delicious.  So what are chalupas? Well what they are not are those hard shelled things you get at Taco Bell. No, no, no.  Real chalupas are antojitos. Typically you eat them as an evening snack or as a starter, and always when celebrating Mexican Independence Day. They are lightly fried small corn tortillas (a little bit crispy but still soft), which have either red or green salsa, that are topped with onion, chicken and sometimes some cheese.

This is a dish for sharing. You don’t order one chalupa, you order a plate of chalupas. And you share them and you eat them with your hands. This is what Mexico, and Puebla is all about: food that is delicious and food that is for sharing. 


Check out Soy Poblana’s facebook page for additional posts and information about life in Puebla and Mexico!

El Flamingo – Tortas de Puebla


Courtesy of (

This is Tortas

Okay, you got me! Tortas are not specifically from Puebla, but good ones are. Too controversial? If you disagree, then please comment below, and pictures provide good evidence. So what’s so special about Poblana tortas? Well I am just basing this on DF and Puebla tortas, but first of all they are crunchier, and most definitely a different shape. For my tasting DF’s tortas are a little too soft. Yes I am a crunchy roll kind of a gal.

A torta in my opinion should be about the size in the picture (maybe a little bigger) and either an oval or circular shape. Inside the Torta, there should be frijoles (beans), avocado, onion, tomato, rajas (if you like spicy), quesillo, and a meat of your choice, if you should desire. Also a bit of mayonnaise can make quite the difference. Personally I also like my Torta toasted.

If that sounds good to you, and you like the look of the picture, then check out ‘El Flamingo’ which is in ‘El Centro’. I recommend these tortas, as they make them just as I mentioned before, and a bonus is that the ‘Milanesa’ isn’t greasy. ‘Milanesa’ is either pork or chicken covered in bread crumbs that is fried (similar to Escalope Vienes/ Wiener Schnitzel), so sometimes if not done correctly can be a little greasy. That is certainly not the case at ‘El Flamingo’. They also serve delicious juices, licuados, and aguas. More on types of drinks to follow in another post!


El Flamingo is located on Av. 2 Poniente between 3 Sur and 5 de Mayo.

Tacos al Pastor


Courtesy of (

This is Tacos al Pastor

Let the taco education continue. Previously I have written about tacos de asada which are one of my personal favourites, but now it is al pastor’s turn. Heavily influenced from shawarma, Tacos al Pastor are slightly different in that the meat is cooked on a standing spit (the same way in which kebab meet is cooked) however the meat is pork rather than lamb. If you are in downtown Puebla around 10am you will see the meat being prepared at every taqueria in sight. Layer by layer the meat is marinaded in spices and layered on the spit, where it then takes hours to reach the tasty meat, which is used in the tacos. Don’t be surprised to see gigantic spits of taco meat before lunch/dinner begins.

What’s that on top of the spit, in the picture below? It’s a pineapple! A crucial part of tacos al pastor is the pineapple. The pineapple, if done correctly, should stand atop of the spit, so it gains the heat, and then pieces of it are cut off and added to the already prepared meat. Being a ‘taquero’ (like the man pictured below) is a real skill, one that you can see in this video. I recommend watching right to the end where you can see how the taquero skilfully cuts the pineapple and catches it with his other hand, that has a taco in it.

Tacos al Pastor vary considerably, in how much the meat is cooked. Some taquerias cook their meat so it is crispier than other places. Now once you have your tacos, which come with cilantro, onion and pineapple, you need to add lemon and green salsa. Tacos al Pastor are always served with a unique green salsa, which takes the flavours to the next level.

Tacos al Pastor are traditionally made using corn tortillas, though you can switch it up and ask for flour tortillas and/or added cheese. ‘Gringas‘ are a flour tortilla, with melted cheese, pastor meat and closed on top with another tortilla.

Where do I go get some delicious tacos al pastor? Well they are not hard to find, especially if you are downtown, but if you are looking for a recommendation then please send me a message through our facebook page.

When should I eat tacos al pastor? Like every type of taco, these are more popular at night but also make for a delicious (all be it a bit naughty) lunch!


two tacos al pastor prepared with pineapple, cilantro, onion and salsa

Vamos a Cuetzalan, Pueblo Mágico


Courtesy of (

This is Cuetzalan

Welcome to Cuetzalan! A hill-top town which has a reputation that proceeds itself amongst most poblanos, but for us foreigners is [most likely] completely unknown. Cuetzalan is a small town set high in the hills of the sierra norte of the state of Puebla, which makes for a great weekend trip. It is only 183 km from the capital, Puebla, but takes around 3 to 4 hours to get there, due to the mountainous roads. Cuetzalan is not just any town but a ‘magical town’ or ‘Pueblo Mágico’. ‘Pueblo Mágico’ is an initiative run by Mexico’s Secretariat of Tourism to promote towns that have been specifically hand picked as they offer a magical experience due to to their natural beauty, rich culture or historical importance.










What makes Cuetzalan so magical? It is a stunning town characterised by its cobbled streets and rustic buildings. It offers a breathtaking setting amongst the hills of the Sierra Madre. Cuetzalan’s main town square (zócalo) is beautiful and offers a few market stalls most days. However the best time to visit is the weekend as Sunday offers the biggest market of the week with the local indigenous community selling all types of goods from fruit to meat to textiles. The food sold in Cuetzalan is delicious, just like in the city of Puebla, but somehow eating street food from a town makes it always that much tastier. The prices are very appealing too. For example the ‘gorditas’ pictures below would cost you approx. 2 pesos each (bargain!).

It is not only the town center that makes Cuetzalan so worth visiting, but also its surrounding area. Pretty much located amongst a jungle type environment, there are many hikes and trails which will lead you tobeautiful waterfalls like the one pictured below. I suggest you go to the tourism office, located in the zócalo, and ask for a local guide, who you can pay for the day to take you around to all the waterfalls. If it is a warm day, you can even go for a swim!

Where to stay? I stayed at a hotel called ‘Hotel La Casa de Piedra‘, which I highly recommend, it is about 2 minutes walk from the zócalo and offers a very rustic, intimate and hacienda-like setting. Prices start from approx. 800 pesos.

How do I get there? You can go from Puebla’s biggest bus station CAPU with the bus line, VIA, the trip takes 3.5 hours and costs 161 pesos. You can find the full bus schedule and costs here as well as how to get to Cuetzalan by car.

Any info missing? The town has a website which is a fantastic resource full of information about hotels, places to visit, restaurants and adventure trips. Check it out here. Be warned it is all in spanish, so if you need any help contact me here or on Soy Poblana’s facebook page.

¡Buen Viaje!


La Pasita


Courtesy of (

La Pasita

This is Licor

La Pasita is most definitely part of Poblano culture and history. The oldest cantina in Puebla, La Pasita has been open since 1916 and sells shots and bottles of hand crafted liquor. The most famous of these, is the so-called ‘pasita’ which is pictured below. It has an unusual taste so I won’t even try to describe it, but it’s worth the try. It is served with a piece of cheese and a grape (or raisin?) which you are supposed to eat before you take the shot. Usually people enjoy the shot sip by sip, but each to their own. Each shot goes for 25 pesos with other crafted liquors available such as Rompope (look out for a post on this) and other flavours such as lemon, coconut and pineapple.

The address is Av 5 Oriente 602, Puebla Centro, 72000 Puebla, Mexico, and is located in the historical centre. It is open till 5.30pm.


Rompope and Pasita Bottles

Three shots of Pasita Por Favor

Taqueria La Esquina


Courtesy of (

Taqueria “La Esquina”

This is Tacos de Alambre

I love tacos. And what you realise living here is that there are so many to tempt you. You’ve got Arabe, Pastor, Asada and a personal favourite – alambre. Taqueria La Esquina is my favourite taco place. Their specialities are tacos al pastor and tacos de alambre. Tacos de Alambre are made my combining certain meats, vegetables and cheese, from which you can make your own tacos. The dish below called ‘alambre’ has: Chuleta (Cutlet of pork), Tocino (Bacon), Cebolla (Onion), Pimiento (Pepper), Queso (Cheese). It is prepared by first cooking the chuleta on a large hot ‘comal‘ (flat griddle) followed by adding the bacon and veggies, then the taquero, mixes all the ingredients together, continuously chopping and mixing.  The last step involves adding cheese which melts on top. Then the plate is served, at which point you can make your taquitos (they are smaller corn tortillas) and add salsa (my favourite being the green one). The deliciousness is hard to explain, so just trust me on this one.

In a recent study, we tested how many taquitos could be made from one alambre portion (that costs 50 pesos), and managed 16! This is a great dish for sharing. Nothing brings people together like tacos. 

one alambre and tortillas

Taqueria ‘La Esquina’ (‘the corner’), which funny enough isn’t on a corner, is located on Boulevard San Felipe at the intersection with Avenida 15 de Mayo. This is most definitely a night visit! Tacos are always best when eaten in the evening.

one taco de alambre made by Soy Poblana


Vamos a Atlixco


Courtesy of (

This is Atlixco

The zócalo in Atlixco

Atlixco, is a small city in the municipality of Puebla, 25 km from the city of Puebla. It is most famous for its incredible flower markets, and its climate.  Its full name is actually Atlixco de las Flores (Atlixco of Flowers) and it is home to ‘the best climate in the world’ according to its tourist office. The town has a very pleasant temperature, perfect for the cultivation of flowers.

So why visit Atlixco?

First of all it’s a great new place to see that is not far from Puebla. Everyone enjoys a fun day trip. Secondly if you are living in Puebla, you can buy a huge array of plants, flowers, and tress for very low prices, to pimp out your garden or house. Thirdly, I recommend checking out the town center where the local ice cream shops sells delicious Avocado ice cream and ice lollies, amongst many other peculiar (and conventional) flavours. It sounds weird, but its delicious. Remember, you are in Mexico, this is the time to be adventurous and try new things.

Many many flowers.

A great place to buy flowers is ‘Viveras Cabrera La Unión’, the address is Ave. 20 Poniente 2501-B Colonia Cabrera. You won’t find plants cheaper than this.  For example a huge bamboo tree will only cost you 70 pesos (£3.5!!).

Palm trees

Ice creams like the one showed below can be bought at ‘La Rosita de Atlixco’ in the zócalo.

Avocado ice lolly